How Do You Produce Ethanol From Pineapple Juice Using Yeast?
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How Do You Produce Ethanol From Pineapple Juice Using Yeast?

Ethanol is described as a volatile, flammable and colorless liquid. It is commonly referred to as simply alcohol since it is the agent found in liquors that cause intoxication. This effect of ethanol consumption has been known throughout history and recently it has been tapped as an alternative source of energy.

Ethanol is described as a volatile, flammable and colorless liquid. It is commonly referred to as simply alcohol since it is the agent found in liquors that cause intoxication. This effect of ethanol consumption has been known throughout history and recently it has been tapped as an alternative source of energy.

Early production of ethanol was made from the fermentation of sugar. Basically this liquid can be made from any plant that contains lots of sugar or parts that can be transformed into sugar for example starch. The process included in ethanol production includes the source, that particular plant proven to be rich in sugar content, being ground for easier processing. Then the sugar is dissolved. Microorganisms then feed on the sugar which produces the ethanol and carbon dioxide as by-product. The last process is to purify the ethanol in order to come up with the correct concentration of the liquid.

Since ethanol can be made from any crop or plant that have high sugar content or cellulose, which can later be converted to sugar, the pineapple fruit was also tested if it can become one of the sources for alternative energy source.

During the process of ethanol production, the pineapple juice is prepared to be used as feed material for production of the said ethanolic product. The impurities are first filtered out in order to produce better quality before introducing the yeast for the fermentation process. Pure culture yeast is most often used for this kind of process. Traditional fermentation used to be time consuming but improvements are have been made and continues research are still being conducted in order to come up with yeasts that will hasten the fermentation process not only in ethanol production but also in other productions that go through the this process such as wine making.

Going back to the fermentation of the pineapple juice, the total sugar concentration of the juice should be measured since the sugar content as against the yeast should be balanced. An imbalance between these two may inhibit the fermentation process. The flow rate during fermentation should also be monitored by the fermenter because the ethanol production capacity is dependent on the flow rate. When the flow rate is controlled, the ethanol concentration can also be controlled. Lastly, the ideal temperature during the fermentation process is within the range of 0 to about 40 degrees celcius.

After fermentation, the ethanolic product produced will then be cooled down to room temperature then collected again to undergo the process of fermentation treatment. This is the purification process wherein the correct concentration of the ethanol is ascertained.

The increasing demand for ethanol for various industrial purposes aside from an alternative energy source has necessitated the production of this alcohol from a plant that for the past years has only been known for its juice and succulent fruit.

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Comments (3)

Never thought you can make ethanol from pineapple. Nice article.

Wow, this is really interesting.

albin sunny

can u give me more details of this process; i am very much intereted in this.. my number is 919895784325

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